Posted by & filed under Demonstration Sites, Food Forests, Food Plants - Perennial, Trees, Urban Projects.


Berries are quick to bear and just make life better

As the perennial vegetable season dries up, berries are coming into full swing. Foraging for fresh fruit in the backyard was a key goal in our garden and this is reflected in the diversity and abundance of berries we enjoy. Within two to three years, all of our berries were yielding well and many were filling in to form nice patches. There’s nothing better than walking out the back door and feasting on five or six different kinds of berries as you make your way through the garden. Jonathan and Meg next door love them on their cereal every morning. We’ve cooked all kinds of dishes with them, but in general, that’s too much work for me: nothing is a satisfying as filling up a handful of berries and shoving them into my mouth, eating them right out in the sunshine.

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Posted by & filed under Courses/Workshops, Demonstration Sites, Urban Projects.

When: July 12, 2014, 9-4pm
Where: Holyoke, Massachusetts, USA

Spend a day with Jonathan Bates and Eric Toensmeier, the co-designers and managers of the garden that inspired the book Paradise Lot.

We will tour the garden and sample the vegetables and fruit that are in season. In summer you may taste blueberries, raspberries, jostaberries, currants, gooseberries, marionberries and many more!

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Posted by & filed under GMOs, Health & Disease.

12 Leading Experts, 17 Invigorating Talks

12 world renown authorities, including several best selling authors, led by Dr. Brian Clement, Jeffrey Smith, Dr. Michael Greger, Dr. Richard Oppenlander, Devra Davis, Cherie Soria and Dan Ladermann, Hans Diehl, Steve Meyerowitz – “Sproutman”, Joseph Keon, Elizabeth Grossman and Dr. Anna Marie Clement spoke at this 3 day conference.

This conference is now being offered for free (original price $149).

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Posted by & filed under General.

by Rob Avis

Read Part I here!

Opportunity is about seeing things differently

What is amazing about permaculture is the number of solutions that are contained within the design system. I often say that the Permaculture Design Certificate (PDC) provides people with a solution matrix they can use to run their problems through. A lot of the time, these derived solutions are not considered in mainstream design professions. As an engineer, doing my PDC brought together a lot of disconnected concepts from school and the petroleum industry in a way that I had never considered before. Permaculture became hugely beneficial in shaping the way I saw design, and it is through this transformative lens that I now see the following niches and opportunities for new permaculture students.

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Posted by & filed under Animal Forage, Land, Plant Systems, Seeds, Soil Biology, Soil Rehabilitation, Structure.


A close up of frost heaves

A common winter sight in most cold temperate regions are frost-heaves; areas of water-saturated soil that have been uplifted due to freezing.

Frost-heaving is generally regarded as an undesirable dynamic, because it evidences a lack of organic material or mulch capable of sheltering the soil (and it’s microinhabitants) from freezing.

However, on degraded and compacted sites, frost heaves are really a great opportunity for establishing vegetation which can ultimately protect and nurture soil life.

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Posted by & filed under GMOs, Soil Erosion & Contamination, Water Contaminaton & Loss.

by GM Freeze

The European Union is considering a hugely significant change to the way genetically modified (GM) crops are authorised. Proposals for “national opt-outs” appear to allow individual countries to make their own decisions about whether or not to grow GM, but past experience shows that the risk of cross-border contamination is likely to make a nonsense of national bans.

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Posted by & filed under GMOs, Soil Erosion & Contamination, Water Contaminaton & Loss.

Michael Hart, a conventional livestock family farmer, has been farming in Cornwall for nearly thirty years and has actively campaigned on behalf of family farmers for over fifteen years, travelling extensively in Europe, India, Canada and the USA.

In this short documentary he investigates the reality of farming genetically modified crops in the USA ten years after their introduction. He travels across the US interviewing farmers and other specialists about their experiences of growing GM.

Posted by & filed under Food Forests, Food Plants - Perennial, Trees.

Dedicated to the memory of Peter Brew 1954-2010


Classic bunya bunya canopy profile at the Bunya Mountains National Park

Equinox gift from the subtropics

It feels like a classic autumn break after a horrible gardening season with alternating cool and scorching hot dry conditions, insect plagues and disease. We’ve had a series of nice rains bringing the first germinating winter clovers, grasses and lush annuals that most people call weeds. It will soon be chestnut harvest time (if we can net some trees against the sulphur crested cockatoos). Soon we will be eating roast chestnuts for breakfast; a small but significant implementation of the permaculture vision of tree crop staples providing a larger part of diet to reduce dependence on wheat, potatoes and other annual staple crops that dominate world food supply.

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