Posted by & filed under General, GMOs, News.

GMO-Award

Environmentalists, including one of the world’s most “powerful” women, have called on the United States Government to withdraw the award it has given to controversial “Golden Rice,” which is widely labelled a hoax.

Highly respected Indian scientist, physicist and ardent environmentalist, Dr. Vandana Shiva responded vehemently to the announcement that the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and the US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) were to award the Golden Rice Project with the prestigious Patents for Humanity Award on Nutrition for 2015. The claim made by the three scientists who invented Golden Rice, which was patented in 2012, is that it provides a miracle cure for hunger and malnutrition, specifically in terms of vitamin A deficiency.

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Posted by & filed under Events, Resources & News.

This Open Day has been canceled due to the extreme weather conditions expected over the weekend and for the safety and wellbeing of people attending.

International-Permaculture-Day-2015

Coinciding with International Permaculture Day, The Permaculture Research Institute will host a free tour of Zaytuna Farm on May 3rd, 2015. People who will be in northern NSW, Australia might want to make themselves available and make a truly International Permaculture Day of it!

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Posted by & filed under Education, Plant Systems, Plants.


-Extreme nutrient scarcity pushes plant roots in Australian kwongan bushlands to cook up ingenious strategies to survive

For a general onlooker, the Australian Outback is nothing more than a bland empty void with low scrubs and bushes. But the kwongan bushland found in the south-west Australia has an unusually rich biodiversity even though subsisting on some of the world’s most infertile soils. In fact, the soil is so barren, that it is impossible to practice agriculture without adding tons of fertilizer and manure to improve the soil fertility.

To adapt to the infertile soils, plants develop phosphorus efficient leaves, which are tough, lasting many years. But below-ground, the story is all together different. Plant roots have all the known adaptation tricks in the text book, to capture the phosphorous they need.

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Posted by & filed under DVDs/Books, Events, Resources & News, General.

Yekra Player

Please click above to watch the Trailer

INHABIT – A Permaculture Perspective

Humanity is more than ever threatened by its own actions; we hear a lot about the need to minimize footprints and to reduce our impact. But what if our footprints were beneficial? What if we could meet human needs while increasing the health and well-being of our planet? This is the premise behind permaculture: a design process based on the replication of patterns found in nature. INHABIT explores the many environmental issues facing us today and examines solutions that are being applied using the ecological design lens of permaculture. Focused mostly on the Northeastern and Midwestern regions of the United States, Inhabit provides an intimate look at permaculture peoples and practices ranging from rural, suburban, and urban landscapes.

For all of you who have pre-purchased, please enjoy, it is a great watch. For all of you who haven’t you can now watch it HERE

Posted by & filed under Animal Housing, Animals, Working Animals.

Backyard-Chickens-Eggs

There is nothing new about free-range chickens and fresh, organic eggs, except that nowadays more people want them – mostly because they are healthier and tastier than other eggs. This has led to a trend in many parts of the world, of keeping chickens for eggs in the backyards of ordinary suburban homes.

By keeping their own hens, people are assured that the eggs they eat are 100 percent organic and totally free from any form of medication, including antibiotics, as well as synthetic colouring that conventional battery hens are commonly pumped with. In addition, the chickens will be healthier and happier than those forced to live in the crammed battery cage conditions of commercial chicken farms in most parts of the world.

Having hens at home is also great for children; not roosters – because they’re noisy and don’t lay eggs. Apart from the fact that they become quite tame (although not very responsive to house training), children love to feed chickens and collect fresh eggs for the table. It’s an ideal way to introduce farm livestock to the suburbs on a small scale, give children a taste of the country, and get them involved in basic husbandry, helping to clean the coop and care for the birds. The chickens will, in turn, do their bit by eating the insects and unwanted bugs they come across in your now pastoral backyard environment.

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Posted by & filed under Courses/Workshops, General.

JULY-PDC-Widg

“The problems of the world are becoming increasingly complex but the answers remain embarrassingly simple” – Bill Mollison

David Spicer and Salah Hammad are joining forces in this year’s Winter Permaculture Design Certificate (PDC) Course at The Permaculture Research Institute, Australia with a guest lecture from Geoff Lawton. It will run for two weeks from Monday the 6th to Friday the 17th of July, 2015.

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Posted by & filed under General, Soil.

“There’s a glowing appreciation for the rarity and value of truly fertile soil”

- Film Journal International, Chris Barsanti

In honor of the International Year of the Soils and the global effort to create soil consciousness, Symphony of the Soil, are allowing us to share their streaming Symphony of the Soil for the week of April 20 – 26 in English with French subtitles for free (The DVD is available in English with subtitles in seven languages – English, French, German, Italian, Portuguese, Chinese and Spanish). You can watch directly from our site above or it can be embedded and shared. You can support the film and the International Year of the Soils by holding a public screening, giving an educational collection to your local library or school, or giving a DVDs to friends. Enjoy and happy International Year of the Soils!

This is a great watch and we appreciate Symphony of the Soil for allowing us to share this with you. If you enjoy the film, please do visit their site and purchase a copy to keep.

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Posted by & filed under General, Population, Society.

Learning and Farming plays a very critical role in life of individual as well as society says Claude Alvares.

He claims that though they seem separate, in reality, they are deeply interconnected.

Claude laments the fact that the way multinational corporations, for their vested interest, are destroying native agricultural practices. He also grieves over how modern educational institutions have destroyed innate learning capacities of students. He emphasize how by returning back to soil (and manual work) will enhance overall education.

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Posted by & filed under Storm Water, Water, Water Conservation.

Water-Management-In-Urban_areas

Water management in rural areas has always been an issue of great interest. On the one hand, water for human, stock and crop use is critical to living and producing. It is also a major factor in the very visible degradation of streams, the creation of gullies and changes to the natural flora and fauna associated with streams.

The common farm-scale actions of clearing, road construction, ploughing, (over) grazing and draining combine to have catchment-scale impacts. These impacts flow from the greater quantity and speed of runoff water which results in soil erosion (involving sediment and nutrient export) and scouring of stream channels which had developed to accommodate a regime of lower stream flows. Downstream impacts on other waterways can also be important: the 2011 floods in South East Queensland were estimated to have dumped 3 million cubic metres of sediment into the aquatic habitat of Moreton Bay.

In many regions, one of the first responses to increasing environmental concerns has been the rehabilitation of rural streams and catchments. In Australia, many Landcare projects in the 1980-90s related to some element of catchment or stream degradation, and Rivercare type programs flourished in the early part of the 21st century.

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Posted by & filed under Community, Community Projects, Education, Permaculture Projects.

wb1

Initial earthworks for an orphanage in Kenya with poor soils in an arid climate.

By Warren Brush of Quail Springs Permaculture and Casitas Valley Farm and Creamery

With rapidly changing climactic and social conditions, we are witnessing instability in many human support systems around the world. Systems that are heavily dependent on centralized infrastructure and globalization for their basic needs of shelter, water, energy and food are the most susceptible to shocks and eventual collapse. Good science along with social and economic feedback tell us that there is a interdependent relationship between how far a resource is from our direct stewardship and how resilient and stable our system will be.

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