A Simple Recipe for Fertiliser Tea

Posted by & filed under Compost, Soil Biology.

This is a very simple fertiliser tea recipe which all plants I have used it on have responded very well to. It uses wild plants which are generally abundant throughout Europe, although I am not sure about the rest of the world; you’ll have to look around for yourself. The ratio I used here is… Read more »

Introduction to Naturalised Nursery Practice

Posted by & filed under Compost, Fungi, Nurseries & Propogation, Plant Systems, Soil Biology, Soil Composition.

Applying the understandings of ecosystem mimicry to create alternative solutions to current nursery practices of disease control, fertilisation and sterile mediums. It is my belief that nature is our greatest teacher. By observing nature we can see that a tree in a forest is self-maintaining. It does not rely on fertilisation, irrigation, pesticides or fungicides… Read more »

Mohamed Hijri: A Simple Solution to the Coming Phosphorus Crisis (video)

Posted by & filed under Food Plants - Annual, Food Plants - Perennial, Fungi, Plant Systems, Soil Biology, Soil Composition, Soil Erosion & Contamination, Water Contaminaton & Loss.

Biologist Mohamed Hijri brings to light a farming crisis no one is talking about: We are running out of phosphorus, an essential element that’s a key component of DNA and the basis of cellular communication. All roads of this crisis lead back to how we farm — with chemical fertilizers chock-full of the element, which… Read more »

Soil, not Dirt – Dr Elaine Ingham Talks Soil Microbiology

Posted by & filed under Compost, Fungi, Soil Biology, Soil Composition, Soil Conservation, Soil Rehabilitation, Soil Salination, Structure.

Dr. Elaine Ingham talks about soil fertility and the role of soil microbial life. Dr. Ingham is a world-renowned soil biologist who pioneered many of the currently used biological soil amendment techniques and pioneered the testing of soil microbial life as an indicator of soil and plant health. Dr. Ingham is the Chief Scientist at… Read more »

Healing the Planet Through Photosynthesis and Carbon Sequestration

Posted by & filed under Global Warming/Climate Change, Livestock, Soil Biology, Soil Composition, Soil Rehabilitation.

If we implement wise geoengineering, even eating meat could help tackle the backlog of carbon dioxide in Earth’s atmosphere. Carbon depleted soil, at left, compared to a carbon rich soil, at right. Eating meat is bad for the planet, right? That hamburger you’re contemplating for lunch comes from a cow that, most likely, was raised… Read more »

Paradigm Shift Urgently Needed In Agriculture – UN Agencies Call for an End to Industrial Agriculture & Food System

Posted by & filed under Biodiversity, Community Projects, Compost, Deforestation, Desertification, Economics, Food Shortages, Global Warming/Climate Change, Irrigation, Land, Peak Oil, People Systems, Regional Water Cycle, Society, Soil Biology, Soil Conservation, Soil Erosion & Contamination, Soil Rehabilitation, Village Development, Water Conservation, Water Contaminaton & Loss, Water Harvesting.

A rising chorus from UN agencies on how food security, poverty, gender inequality and climate change can all be addressed by a radical transformation of our agriculture and food system. by Dr Mae-Wan Ho A fully referenced version of this article is posted on ISIS members’ website and is otherwise available for download here. Agriculture… Read more »

Wildlife Friendly Gardening Begins Beneath Us

Posted by & filed under Soil Biology, Soil Conservation, Soil Rehabilitation, Structure.

Why dig? Why turn over tonnes of topsoil year after year. We know permanent soil has properties that annual crops need and which sustains bio diversity. Why disturb and destroy the goodness that nature provides? Salad, herbs, onions, garlic, brassica, peas, beans, and ornamentals are examples of plants that can be cultivated without digging. One… Read more »

Get Your Food from a Firehose

Posted by & filed under Compost, Fungi, Soil Biology, Soil Rehabilitation.

We have been delving into the dirty secret behind our food, which is that it comes from bacteria — primarily, with considerable assistance from a social network of fungi, nematodes, micro-arthropods and soil-dwelling microbes of various descriptions. Most people, asked what plants eat, answer something like, "sunlight, water and dirt." Water and sunlight play an… Read more »

Report on Permaculture Training in Dembe Dollo, Western Ethiopia (Part 3)

Posted by & filed under Aid Projects, Community Projects, Compost, Demonstration Sites, Education Centres, Irrigation, Land, Soil Biology, Soil Rehabilitation, Village Development.

This is part three of a report on a community training program we ran in Dembe Dolo, Wolega, Eastern Ethiopia back in June, 2013. If you didn’t catch the last installments you can read them here: Part 1, Part 2. If you recall we started the training program off with introductions from the group and… Read more »

A Computer Geek Starts a Garden, Part II – We Are Chlorophyll Managers

Posted by & filed under Biodiversity, Compost, Economics, Food Plants - Annual, Food Plants - Perennial, Fungi, Global Warming/Climate Change, Health & Disease, Soil Biology, Soil Composition, Soil Conservation, Soil Rehabilitation, Structure.

Last night I ate a couple of dozen cherry tomatoes from my just-getting-started garden. A little pepper and salt and I was in tomato heaven. I was expecting them to taste a whole lot better than the supermarket ‘tomatoes‘ I’m otherwise forced to consume, and I was not at all disappointed. Indeed, every cell of… Read more »

Cover Crops Solutions Chart

Posted by & filed under Animal Forage, Compost, Plant Systems, Soil Biology, Soil Composition, Soil Conservation, Soil Rehabilitation, Structure, Water Conservation.

Click pic to download PDF As most readers of this site will recognise, nature always works to protect the soil from from wind and water erosion — by covering it with living foliage. In doing so, the cycle of life and death continues, increasing the soil’s fertility over time. Alas, many ‘modern’ gardeners have allowed… Read more »