Tough Fruit

Posted by & filed under Food Forests, Food Plants - Perennial, Medicinal Plants, Trees.

A line of thought evolving from the interest in both epigenetics and the Paleo diet has led to an exploration of low cultivated, western European, Asian and North American fruit trees in our Food Forest systems. What does this mean? Well, we all love fruit. A fresh, crispy apple or sweet, fleshy nectarine are hard… Read more »

Conventional Vs. Organic Vs. The Future of Food

Posted by & filed under Food Plants - Annual, Food Plants - Perennial, Health & Disease, Soil Rehabilitation.

People are awakening to a vision where they can see themselves as less stressed, having more quality time to spend with family, and real food laced with nature’s nutrition. Our great grandparents and, for some, grandparents could have told you of a time when there was no such thing as a supermarket. As a point… Read more »

Food from Perennial(ising) Plants in Temperate Climate Australia, for August 2013

Posted by & filed under Food Forests, Food Plants - Annual, Food Plants - Perennial, Medicinal Plants.

Editor’s Note: I want to express my heartfelt thanks to Susan for taking the initiative for this excellent series, and, I’d also like to second Susan’s request for volunteers to continue it! There may also be individuals who would like to start a similar series for other climate zones. Either way, you’re encouraged to contact… Read more »

OrBio – a Cover Crop Strategy for Market Gardens

Posted by & filed under Commercial Farm Projects, Food Plants - Annual, Food Plants - Perennial, Land, Plant Systems, Soil Conservation, Soil Rehabilitation, Structure, Water Conservation.

A bug’s eye view of the sky, from a stand of cover crop Photo © Craig Mackintosh A recent post by Australian permaculture aid worker, Miles Durand, writing from Lesotho, reminded me to share a method of growing vegetable crops alongside cover crops that I learned when I studied organic biological horticulture many years ago…. Read more »

Small Scale Nursery Applications: Reflections from Loping Coyote Farms Nursery (NV, USA)

Posted by & filed under Food Forests, Food Plants - Annual, Food Plants - Perennial, Nurseries & Propogation, Plant Systems, Trees.

by Neil Bertrando , Eric Toensmeier Plant materials are a critical component of any homestead or agroecology site, and by using the permaculture design concept, we can figure out many yields to pattern into our management activities. I want to explore some opportunities presented by integrating a small scale nursery into the process of site… Read more »

Arracacha, The Perennial Root of the Andes

Posted by & filed under Food Plants - Perennial.

When I first moved to northern New South Wales to live and work at Zaytuna Farm as a nurseryman, I had to readjust my botanical eye to my new surroundings. What grew where and how? What were the predominant local natives? The commonly planted fruit trees? The commonly cultivated vegetables? Catching my eye almost immediately… Read more »

Permaculture is Weaving Magic! (Maharashtra, India)

Posted by & filed under Demonstration Sites, Food Forests, Food Plants - Annual, Food Plants - Perennial, Plant Systems.

by Jyoti Deshpande, Chaitraban It has been almost three years, and, as Toby Hemenway says, the magic is happening! The trees are yielding shiny tasty food, the variety of weeds on the land is slowly reducing, the soil is a darker colour now and there are tons and tons of predatory insects patrolling the site.

Maximum Yield Cropping System (MYCS)

Posted by & filed under Food Plants - Annual, Food Plants - Perennial, Plant Systems, Soil Conservation, Soil Rehabilitation.

There are many economic, social and environmental benefits to be gained by increasing the current yield from existing food production areas, including increased employment, food production and community food security, and most important, the prevention of clearing more forests for food production. Natural ecosystem services are essential for human existence, providing life support functions such… Read more »