Attracting Wild Animals for the Good of the Garden: Which, Why, and How

Posted by & filed under Animal Housing, Insects, Working Animals.

A colony of bats in a mango tree Permaculture designs, especially on a large-scale, incorporate domesticated animals. For organic gardening, it just makes life a lot easier. Manure is key in growing anything. A timed circulation of grazing means the land gets cleared, fertilized and tilled by the animals’ natural patterns as opposed to the… Read more »

Why Silkies Are the Perfect Hens for Small Gardens

Posted by & filed under Animal Housing, Bird Life, Fencing, Livestock, Urban Projects.

I started my journey with chickens with two lovely ex-battery hens who were so friendly and were real pets. However, they made short shrift of my garden and tended to wander everywhere into other people’s lawns. No matter how often I clipped their wings, they kept getting out. Although I really loved those two characters,… Read more »

Taranaki Farm Chicken System (Victoria, Australia)

Posted by & filed under Animal Housing, Commercial Farm Projects, Demonstration Sites, Fencing, Livestock.

Taranaki Farm is truly a wonderful place to witness. The farm focuses on producing pastured poultry, beef and pork, with laying hens moved onto new pasture every few days. It is a great combination of high tech and old-world, using electric fencing to keep the animals on fresh grass. This style of animal management helps… Read more »

Urban Garden Demonstration Update (New Zealand)

Posted by & filed under Animal Forage, Animal Housing, Breeds, Demonstration Sites, Education Centres, Food Forests, Food Plants - Annual, Food Plants - Perennial, Livestock, Urban Projects.

by Kay Baxter, PRI New Zealand (Koanga Institute) This is an update on our urban permaculture garden experiment which integrates the best ideas from our Permaculture Design Course students into a working urban garden here in our North Island, New Zealand temperate climate. Our end product includes rabbits, chickens, a 36 sq m biointensive garden,… Read more »

Open Source Beehives

Posted by & filed under Animal Housing, Building, Community Projects, Insects.

We are all too familiar with the Colony Collapse Disorder afflicting our precious bees. So much needs to be done to educate the mass (and beekeepers) about what bees truly need. The Open Source Beehives project is another powerful initiative marrying traditional designs with high tech equipment to promote healthier beekeeping practices. They have designed… Read more »

Building the Chicken Tractor on Steroids

Posted by & filed under Animal Forage, Animal Housing, Bird Life, Commercial Farm Projects, Compost, Fencing, Land, Livestock, Soil Rehabilitation, Waste Systems & Recycling, Working Animals.

Trailer only — watch full video here! "Who can weld?" Geoff asks. Keen to impress, my hand goes up. “I will see you at the shed after dinner tonight then”, a twinkle of excitement in his eye. This is the story of the chicken tractor on steroids from concept to birth.

Keeping Chickens

Posted by & filed under Animal Housing, Bird Life, Livestock, Working Animals.

The scientific name for chickens is Gallus domesticus for domesticated chickens. Domesticated chickens have been bred by humans from Asian jungle fowls. The chicken is the closest living relative to the great Tyrannosaurus rex. In a Permaculture environment all animals are important, but by breeding smaller animals you will receive more benefits than breeding larger… Read more »

Rough, Ready, But Very Real – a November 2013 Update on the Jordan Valley Permaculture Project (aka ‘Greening the Desert – the Sequel’ Site)

Posted by & filed under Aid Projects, Animal Housing, Biological Cleaning, Building, Community Projects, Compost, Demonstration Sites, Education Centres, Energy Systems, Fencing, Food Forests, Land, Plant Systems, Soil Conservation, Soil Rehabilitation, Trees, Urban Projects, Village Development, Waste Systems & Recycling, Water Conservation, Water Harvesting.

Project from above, featuring a garbage-accumulating fence edge Well, you would be hard pressed to find a tougher block of land — a 400m below sea level, West facing slope, in an extremely hot, arid climate, with extremely poor, shallow highly alkaline top ‘soil’, covered in rocks, with a limited water supply and in a… Read more »

A Worm Farm in Your Duck Coop! (Alaska)

Posted by & filed under Animal Housing, Bird Life, Compost, Land, Livestock, Urban Projects, Working Animals.

In my last article I discussed the challenges of keeping ducks in backyard permaculture. There are two primary problems, at their worst in the coop itself; first is the soggy, mucky mess — from both wet poop and spillage from the waterer. The second problem is that ducks’ webbed feet pack the poop down, and… Read more »

Report on a Permaculture Internship – Strawberry Fields Eco Lodge (Sept-Oct, 2013, Ethiopia)

Posted by & filed under Aid Projects, Animal Housing, Community Projects, Courses/Workshops, Demonstration Sites, Education Centres, Energy Systems, Retrofitting.

Editor’s Note: Beginning 2 December 2013, Alex is running another PDC at the developing Strawberry Fields Eco Lodge in southern Ethiopia. Following that will be a four-week Internship, starting 16 December, 2013. Why not book your place and head off for the learning and cultural immersion experience of a lifetime! This is a write up… Read more »

An Adventure with Bees in Guatemala

Posted by & filed under Animal Housing, Insects.

This is a story of young permaculture practitioners with big dreams, a gang of plucky volunteers, and a wiley Mayan bee man doing the proverbial waggle dance with nature’s best pollinators, in an attempt to monopolise their golden liquid treasure for ourselves. The story takes place in Guatemala, in an extinct volcano that has inverted… Read more »

Poo-Free Self-Filling Duck Waterer

Posted by & filed under Animal Housing, Bird Life, Livestock.

The mob If any of you have had any experience with ducks, you’ll know that they produce and deposit enormous amounts of nutrient — aka duck poo. It usually ends up over everything they come in contact with. A general good practice is to keep them on water and then either fertigate (fertilize while irrigating)… Read more »