Food or Fuel?

Posted by & filed under Biodiversity, Biofuels, Consumerism, Deforestation, Desertification, Food Shortages, Global Warming/Climate Change, Peak Oil, Soil Erosion & Contamination, Water Contaminaton & Loss.

by Lester R. Brown, Earth Policy Institute At the time of the Arab oil export embargo in the 1970s, the importing countries were beginning to ask themselves if there were alternatives to oil. In a number of countries, particularly the United States, several in Europe, and Brazil, the idea of growing crops to produce fuel… Read more »

Peak Water: What Happens When the Wells Go Dry?

Posted by & filed under Consumerism, Deforestation, Desertification, Food Shortages, Global Warming/Climate Change, Soil Erosion & Contamination, Water Contaminaton & Loss.

by Lester R. Brown, Earth Policy Institute Peak oil has generated headlines in recent years, but the real threat to our future is peak water. There are substitutes for oil, but not for water. We can produce food without oil, but not without water. We drink on average four liters of water per day, in… Read more »

Farmed Fish Production Overtakes Beef

Posted by & filed under Biodiversity, Consumerism, Deforestation, Food Shortages, Health & Disease, Society, Soil Erosion & Contamination, Water Contaminaton & Loss.

Janet Larsen and J. Matthew Roney, Earth Policy Institute The world quietly reached a milestone in the evolution of the human diet in 2011. For the first time in modern history, world farmed fish production topped beef production. The gap widened in 2012, with output from fish farming—also called aquaculture—reaching a record 66 million tons,… Read more »

China’s Growing Hunger for Meat Shown by Move to Buy Smithfield, World’s Leading Pork Producer

Posted by & filed under Consumerism, Deforestation, Desertification, Economics, Soil Erosion & Contamination, Water Contaminaton & Loss.

by Janet Larsen, Earth Policy Institute Half the world’s pigs—more than 470 million of them—live in China, but even that may not be enough to satisfy the growing Chinese appetite for meat. While meat consumption in the United States has fallen more than 5 percent since peaking in 2007, Chinese meat consumption has leapt 18… Read more »

Dozens of U.S. Cities Board the Bike-Sharing Bandwagon

Posted by & filed under Community Projects, Peak Oil, Urban Projects, Village Development.

by Janet Larson, Earth Policy Institute When New York City opened registration for its much anticipated public bike-sharing program on April 15, 2013, more than 5,000 people signed up within 30 hours. Eager for access to a fleet of thousands of bicycles, they became Citi Bike members weeks before bikes were expected to be available…. Read more »

Bike-Sharing Programs Hit the Streets in Over 500 Cities Worldwide

Posted by & filed under Consumerism, Peak Oil, Society.

by Janet Larsen, Earth Policy Institute Politicians, lobbyists, and tourists alike can ride bicycles along a specially marked lane between the White House and the U.S. Capitol, part of the 115 miles of bicycle lanes and paths that now crisscross Washington, DC. In Copenhagen, commuters can ride to work following a “green wave” of signal… Read more »

Full Planet, Empty Plates: The New Geopolitics of Food Scarcity – Chapter 1, Food: The Weak Link

Posted by & filed under Biofuels, Economics, Food Shortages, Global Warming/Climate Change.

by Lester R. Brown, Earth Policy Institute The world is in transition from an era of food abundance to one of scarcity. Over the last decade, world grain reserves have fallen by one third. World food prices have more than doubled, triggering a worldwide land rush and ushering in a new geopolitics of food. Food… Read more »

Falling Gasoline Use Means United States Can Just Say No to New Pipelines and Food-to-Fuel

Posted by & filed under Consumerism, Economics, Peak Oil, Society.

by Janet Larsen, Earth Policy Institute Freeing America from its dependence on oil from unstable parts of the world is an admirable goal, but many of the proposed solutions—including the push for more home-grown biofuels and for the construction of the new Keystone XL pipeline to transport Canadian tar sands oil to refineries on the… Read more »

Iowa and South Dakota Approach 25 Percent Electricity from Wind in 2012: Unprecedented Contribution of Wind Power in U.S. Midwest

Posted by & filed under Energy Systems.

by J. Matthew Roney, Earth Policy Institute Defying conventional wisdom about the limits of wind power, in 2012 both Iowa and South Dakota generated close to one quarter of their electricity from wind farms. Wind power accounted for at least 10 percent of electricity generation in seven other states. Across the United States, wind power… Read more »

The Energy Game is Rigged: Fossil Fuel Subsidies Topped $620 Billion in 2011

Posted by & filed under Consumerism, Economics, Global Warming/Climate Change.

by Emily E. Adams, Earth Policy Institute The energy game is rigged in favor of fossil fuels because we omit the environmental and health costs of burning coal, oil, and natural gas from their prices. Subsidies manipulate the game even further. According to conservative estimates from the Global Subsidies Initiative and the International Energy Agency… Read more »